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Oral presentation examples

It is always a good idea to structure your talk so that anyone in the audience can understand what you are presenting. A good scientist should be able to present complex, scientific ideas, no matter how technical, in a simple, easy to follow manner. Complexity is not a necessity, it is an annoyance. Understand your purpose. This way you can get the point of your talk across appropriately and affectively by catering to your specific audience. Practice your talk enough so that you have flow, but no so much that you have the entire talk memorized.


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Department of Neurology


Clear and logical delivery of your ideas and scientific results is an important component of a successful scientific career. Presentations encourage broader dissemination of your work and highlight work that may not receive attention in written form. Philip E. This article condenses his excellent list of rules for making a good oral presentation. Know your audience — their backgrounds and knowledge level of the material you are presenting and what they are hoping to get out of the presentation.

Deliver what the audience wants to hear. Your knowledge of the subject is best expressed through a clear and concise presentation that is provocative and leads to a dialog during the questionand-answer session when the audience becomes active participants. At that point, your knowledge of the material will likely become clear.

Remember the audience's time is precious and should not be abused by presentation of uninteresting preliminary material.

A good rule of thumb is this: if you ask a member of the audience a week later about your presentation, he or she should be able to remember three points. If these are the key points you were trying to get across, you have done a good job. If they can remember any three points, but not the key points, then your emphasis was wrong.

It is obvious what it means if they cannot recall three points! Think of the presentation as a story. There is a logical flow—a clear beginning, middle, and an end. You set the stage beginning , you tell the story middle , and you have a big finish the end where the take-home message is clearly understood. Presentations should be entertaining, but do not overdo it and do know your limits.

If you are not humorous by nature, do not try and be humorous. If you are not good at telling anecdotes, do not try and tell anecdotes, and so on. A good entertainer will captivate the audience and improve his or chances of following Rule 4.

The more you practice, the less likely you will be to go off on tangents. The more presentations you give, the better you are going to get. An important talk should not be given for the first time to an audience of peers.

You should have delivered it to your research collaborators who will be kinder and gentler but still point out obvious discrepancies. Even more important, when you give the presentation, stick to what you practice.

If you have more than one visual for each minute you are talking, you have too many and you will run over time. Obviously some visuals are quick, others take time to get the message across. Avoid reading the visual unless you wish to emphasize the point explicitly. The visual should support what you are saying either for emphasis or with data to prove the verbal point.

Finally, do not overload the visual. Make the points few and clear. There is nothing more effective than listening to, or listening to and viewing, a presentation you have made. Seeing what is wrong is easy, correcting it the next time around is not. Work hard on breaking bad habits; it is important. It is often appropriate to acknowledge people at the beginning or at the point of their contribution so that their contributions are very clear.

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Oral Presentation Tips

To dramatize this third point, the speaker filled the presentation screen—which up to then had held colorful Powerpoint slides employing slick transitions and graphics—with nothing. He simply left the screen blank, proposed the option of taking no action, and then shut off the projector. For the next five minutes, he engaged the audience members—which included the company president and the company accountant—by switching to a lecture format, moving around the room without so much as a pointer or note card, and arguing his case: that it was smarter for the company to maintain status quo, especially since it was struggling financially. Ultimately, he impressed his point on the audience not with the magic of presentation software, but with reasoning, creativity, common sense, and the bottom line. As the speaker hoped, the company bought into option number 3. As this example demonstrates, effective oral presentation is more about creative thinking on your feet and basic skills than about wearing good shoes and knowing how to turn on the computer projector. Companies have long cried for graduates who can give dynamic talks, and they have long relied on talks as a key way to sway concerned parties towards a desired outcome.

An oral presentation is a short talk on a set topic given to a tutorial or seminar group. main points and present examples and evidence.

Oral Presentations: Tips, Significance, Design, Guidelines & Presentation


An oral presentation concentrates on communicating something that matters to the speaker to a familiar audience of peers. Presentations are generally prepared ahead of time in writing and sometimes include visual elements that engage the audience. You can do an oral presentation on any number of subjects:. Think of some oral presentations that you have done in the past or that you have experienced as an audience member. You can also use the following tool to brainstorm ideas for your presentation:. Use key words or sentences in point form to remember important information. If you decide to use a visual or media element to support your oral presentation, use the following planning tool:. You can ask a classmate, a teacher or a parent to give you feedback and improve your presentation. How you present is as important as what you present.

Oral Presentations

oral presentation examples

I hope that, from this activity, you learn that the concepts from the course are important in real-world public speaking situations, and I hope you learn how important it is to make your points crystal clear to the audience. Read the questions and the grading criteria below before you watch the speech, so you know what to look for. When the speech is done, go back and answer the rest of the questions below. Then, grade the speech using the grading criteria at the bottom.

Oral presentations are often supplemented by some sort of slideshow e. UURAF will be a hybrid event consisting of oral, poster, performance, and virtual presentations.

Oral Presentation Example Analysis


Oral presentations are a form of assessment that calls on students to use the spoken word to express their knowledge and understanding of a topic. It allows capture of not only the research that the students have done but also a range of cognitive and transferable skills. A common format is in-class presentations on a prepared topic, often supported by visual aids in the form of PowerPoint slides or a Prezi, with a standard length that varies between 10 and 20 minutes. In-class presentations can be performed individually or in a small group and are generally followed by a brief question and answer session. Oral presentations are often combined with other modes of assessment; for example oral presentation of a project report, oral presentation of a poster, commentary on a practical exercise, etc.

Organizing Academic Research Papers: Giving an Oral Presentation

It is likely that you already have a topic and you know what you want to say about it. This is the content of your presentation. You may already have the content of your presentation in written form: for example in a written report. Whether your content is already written down or you are beginning from scratch, you may need to cut it down for your presentation. You will need to fit your content within the time limit. Think carefully about how much information you can reasonably present in the time allowed and select the most important point.

IEEE Xplore includes downloadable ppt presentations illustrating Gross's examples. Stevens, Betsy (). "What communication skills do.

This activity helps students clarify the oral presentation genre; do this after distributing an assignment—in this case, a standard individual oral presentation near the end of the semester which allows students to practice public speaking while also providing a means of workshopping their final paper argument. Together, the class will determine the criteria by which their presentations should—and should not—be assessed. Creating an Oral Presentation Rubric In-class activity.

Here are some tips to help you bring order to the ideas swirling in your head—and communicate the key points about your research to an audience. Find out how long your talk should be. As you decide what to present, keep in mind that a ten-minute talk is very different from a minute lecture. Time yourself giving your talk, and make cuts if you need to. It is fine to end a bit early.

It should be useful for anyone who wants to know how to speak in public. The content is the most obvious component of any oral presentation — after all, if you are talking, you had better have something worthwhile to say.

Clear and logical delivery of your ideas and scientific results is an important component of a successful scientific career. Presentations encourage broader dissemination of your work and highlight work that may not receive attention in written form. Philip E. This article condenses his excellent list of rules for making a good oral presentation. Know your audience — their backgrounds and knowledge level of the material you are presenting and what they are hoping to get out of the presentation. Deliver what the audience wants to hear.

Jump to navigation. Giving an oral presentation as part of a speaking exam can be quite scary, but we're here to help you. Watch two students giving presentations and then read the tips carefully.




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  1. Shak

    Brilliantly

  2. Abbas

    I know that it is necessary to do)))