How to Bi-Wire and Bi-Amp Home Theater Speakers: What does it mean and is it worth it?



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What does it mean when you have two sets of binding posts on your speaker? It means that your speaker can be bi-wired or bi-amped. What is bi-amping and bi-wiring, and how do you do it? We'll cover the steps in this video.

Chapters
0:00 Introduction
0:12 What is bi-wiring and bi-amping?
1:23 How to bi-wire a speaker
2:13 How to bi-amp a speaker

In this video:

Fluance Signature 3-Way Floorstanding Speakers (HFF)
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Fluance Reference 3-Way Floorstanding Loudspeakers (XL8F)
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Fluance Elite Surround Sound Home Theater 5.0 Channel Speaker System (SX)
→ https://www.fluance.com/sxhtbw-high-definition-surround-sound-home-theater-speaker-system

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TRANSCRIPT:

Today, we're going to cover what both bi-wiring and bi-amping are, and how to do it. If your speaker has two sets of binding posts, it can be either bi-wired or bi-amped. What is the purpose of the two binding posts? One set of binding posts covered one driver, or drivers, and the other set of binding posts covers the other driver, or drivers. Allowing the drivers to be powered separately, resulting in a cleaner sound.

When the speaker arrives at your doorstep, there will be a bridge connecting the two terminals. When this bridge is connecting the two terminals, you can use one set of speaker wire to power all drivers in the speaker. When you remove the bridge, you can then power them separately by bi-amping.

When you bi-wire a speaker, you run two sets of wire from one set of outputs on your receiver. One set of wires goes to one set of binding posts on the speaker, and one goes to the other binding posts.

To bi-amp a speaker, you are using two sets of outputs on your receiver to power one speaker. One set of speaker wire connects to one set of binding posts, and one set of speaker wire connects to the other set of binding posts. When it comes to bi-amping, you can also use two separate amplifiers, to power one speaker.

To bi-wire a speaker...
- Make sure that the entire system is powered off.
- Remove the bridges from the speaker's binding posts.
- Get two sets of speaker wires.
- On the receiver, connect two sets of wires to the left channel out outputs.
- Connect one set of these wires to a set of binding posts on the left channel speaker, and the other set of speaker wire to the other set of binding posts on the left channel speaker, making sure that polarity is correct.
- Repeat these steps on the other channels.

To bi-amp a speaker, you will need to 'borrow' an unused channel.

For example, if you want to bi-amp your front left and front right, you will use both the front left and front right channel on your receiver, as well as another set of unused channels, such as the surround left or surround right.

This is why it's important to consider the number of channels when buying a receiver. If you have a 5.1 setup, for example, and are using all 5 channels, you will not be able to bi-amp. If you have a 7.1 receiver, and a 5.1 setup, you will be able to bi-amp, because you will have those two unused channels that you can use.

And, again, you can also use two separate amplifiers to do this. But, to bi-amp using your receiver

- Make sure the system is off.
- Remove the bridges on the speaker's binding posts
connect one output on the receiver, such as the front left channel, to one set of binding posts on the front left channel speaker.
- Connect the other output on the receiver, such as your back left channel, to the other set of binding posts on your front left channel speaker.
- Configure your receiver to bi-amp. Every receiver is different, so we can't give you the exact steps. Check your receiver's manual to learn the best way to do this.

If you found this video helpful, click one of the videos that are popping up on your screen right now. And as always, thank you very much for watching.
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