Yellowstone National Park Officials Just Detected A Huge Sudden Uplift Inside The Volcano System



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Wyoming's Yellowstone National Park is one of the unique places on Earth. Not only is it the site
of a massive volcano, but it's also home to an active geyser field and a variety of other hot
springs and geothermal features. Visitors can see steam rising from the ground, bubbling mud
pots, and even geysers erupting. It's also a marvelous place to see wildlife, including bison,
elks, antelopes, wolves, and bears.
The location of Yellowstone makes it a bit remote, and the geothermal features can be
dangerous. The Yellowstone National Park expands over 3500 square miles, sitting atop a
volcanic hot spot. Most of the park lies in Wyoming, while some parts spread to Montano and
Idaho. Canyons, alpine rivers, and lush forests are features typical of the Yellowstone National
Park.
Yellowstone National Park was built on top of a supervolcano. Supervolcanoes can be
described as volcanoes that produce more than a thousand cubic kilometers of gas, ash,
magma, and rock. Lake Toba in Indonesia, Lake Taupo in New Zealand, and Yellowstone in the
United States are supervolcanoes that erupted less than 100,000 years ago.

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